Forgiveness News

Pride Plays a Part in Denying Wrong-doing

Las Vegas Review-Journal. Steven Kalas, a counselor in Nevada, has an interesting reflection on forgiveness. His main point is that those who transgress sometimes tend to hide this fact from themselves. Pride is the central barrier to admitting that one has done wrong. Yet, eventually, this realization can come pouring out and how should the recipient of this humble confession react to it?

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Forgiving Kony, Restoring Uganda

Vimeo.com. The Fetzer Institute has produced an eye-opening video, Uganda: The Challenge of Forgiveness with interviews from several community leaders including Archbishop John Baptist Odama, Archdiocese of Gulu, Macleord Baker Ochola II, Anglican Bishop, Ret., Angelina Atyam, Founder of Concerned Parents Assn., Nelson Onono-Onweng, Anglican Bishop, Ret., and Msgr. Matthew Odong, Vicar General, Archdiocese of Gulu. See how the people of Uganda are working to restore the devastation created by the Lord’s Resistance Army through forgiveness and reconciliation efforts.

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Mother of Slain Son Forgives the Killer After Court Sentencing

Theday.com (Connecticut). After her son’s killer, Wendy Georges, delivered a heartfelt apology at his sentencing in New London Thursday, the mother of fatal stabbing victim John Stevens Fleurimond stood up in court to say she forgives him.

Louis said in court that the killing was a mistake, an act between two friends during a poker game.

She even went to hug George, but she was restrained by the Judicial Marshals.

“I forgive him,” cried the mother, Marie Jean Louis. “Because it was a mistake. I know it was a mistake.”

Full story here.

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World War II Holocaust Survivor: “Forgiveness is the key for survival and healing”

The Daily Courier (Prescott, Arizona) – Irene Danon, 82, hid from the Nazis in the former Yugoslavia during World War II. She lost family in the concentration camps and yet she says today that learning to forgive the Germans and others, responsible for the genocide of over 6 million people, is the key to her own survival and healing. She says that her parents both died in their 60s because they could not forgive. Her brother died at age 57 for this same reason.

“I hope to show the world the Holocaust really happened, and in order to move on and heal myself, I have learned to forgive,” Danon said. “Forgiveness is the key for survival and healing.”

Full story here.

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VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR RESEARCH PROJECT

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