Tagged: “family”

Is Forgiveness Always Appropriate When Faced with Serious Injustices?

Is forgiveness always appropriate when there is a deep unfairness? First, let’s examine the response a little more. When we ask this question, are we inquiring about a specific person or about the virtue of forgiveness itself? Here is where there is a crucial difference.

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Since forgiveness is a moral virtue, we should ask our question of all virtues if our attention is on the virtue itself. As we broaden our view to focus on all moral virtues, we can consider the question’s opposite: For example, when is a quest for justice, one of the moral virtues, not appropriate? Put another way, can you picture a situation in which you might be arrested for intentionally acting in a just way? Would people condemn themselves for acting fairly? If not, then it appears to be the case that justice is always fitting in every situation. Is there ever a time when patience is inappropriate? How about showing kindness? I can hear someone say something like, “Well, I won’t be kind if someone is hitting me over the head with a frying pan.” I agree that your leaving the abuse is good because it is a protection for you. As a second possible response, you certainly are entitled to attempt removing the frying pan from the person’s grasp. You can act in either situation with kindness. Kindness is appropriate even in this instance. If kindness is used with other virtues (justice, courage, temperance) to help save the individual from doing the head-banging, then that is acceptable in the sense of being morally good.

My argument is that since all virtues are centered on the morally beneficial aspects of human interaction, then acting morally is always appropriate, and practicing forgiveness is one of these moral virtues.

The second aspect of the question (Is forgiveness always appropriate?) asks about the psychological suitability of practicing the virtue for any given individual. Does forgiveness make sense for any particular person all the time? This time, the answer is no, it is not always appropriate for the following reasons: a) the offended person may be too shocked by what happened to be ready to offer forgiveness at this time; b) the offended person may need to learn more about forgiveness to exercise forgiveness properly rather than some false form of it; and c) forgiveness is a supererogatory virtue that is not demanded of any one person at a particular time because it is not a virtue that society demands. It is the person’s decision to extend forgiveness or not on any particular occasion.

Is forgiveness always appropriate?

Yes, if we are talking about the quality of this term, specifically its quality of being a moral virtue.

Must, then, all people turn immediately to forgiveness when treated unjustly?

No, if we are discussing the psychological makeup of a certain individual, including both this person’s degree of hurt and understanding of forgiveness, as well as the specifics of the injustice, such as its gravity, duration, and time since it happened. Some people need time to be angry, to sort out what forgiveness is, and then move forward with it when the person is ready.

 

 

 

 

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Forgiveness Education Identified by the CDC as a way to “Promote Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Learning”

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recently released a new “Action Guide for School and District Leaders on Promoting Mental Health and Well-Being in Schools” and Dr. Suzanne Freedman’s 2018 Journal of Moral Education article, “Forgiveness as an educational goal with at-risk adolescents,” was included as an example program for what schools can do to “Promote Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Learning.”  Forgiveness education helps students recognize and express all emotions, with a specific emphasis on the message that anger is a normal and natural emotion and it is what we do with our anger that can be considered good or bad. It helps students recognize, express, and decrease anger as well as develop perspective-taking skills, empathy, and compassion for one’s offender and others.  To have the CDC recognize it and use it as an example of a targeted approach to teach emotional development illustrates how important forgiveness education is in teaching students to express and regulate all emotions, specifically the release of anger after conflict and situations of interpersonal or intrapersonal hurt.

As described in the abstract in Freedman’s (2018) study,  forgiveness education  was implemented with 10 at-risk adolescents

Dr. Suzanne Freedman

attending an alternative high school in a Midwestern city. Twenty-one participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (forgiveness education class) or the control group (personal communications class). Classes met daily for 31 sessions for approximately 23 hours of education. Enright’s process model of forgiveness was used as the focus of the intervention. After the education, the experimental group gained more than the control group in forgiveness and hope, and decreased significantly more than the control group in anxiety and depression. Verbal reports from the experimental participants following the education also illustrate the positive impact forgiveness had on the students.

Go to the following link, https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/mental-health-action-guide/index.html, to see the CDC’s recommendations for “Promoting Mental Health and Well-Being in Schools.”  To specifically view Freedman’s (2018) article, click on the tab, “Promote Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Learning,” then scroll down again and click on “Example Programs” under “Offer Targeted Education Focused on Teaching Social Skills and Emotional Development,” then click on “Forgiveness within the family.”  If you are not an APA member, to access the article go to,  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322326007_Forgiveness_as_an_educational_goal_with_at-risk_adolescents
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Dr. Enright Interviews with Dr. Sanjay Gupta on His CNN Podcast, Chasing Life

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On December 5, 2023 Dr. Enright engaged in a 35 minute interview with Dr. Sanjay Gupta for his CNN podcast, Chasing Life. It was a wide-ranging interview including what forgiveness is and is not, the scientific evidence for the efficacy of forgiving those who have been deeply unjust, and the psychological and physical outcomes for those who forgive. They even discussed the effects of forgiving on the brain. Click on this link to listen to the episode or read the transcript of the episode!

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